linkedARC.net

My doctoral research focuses on the subject of Archaeological Digital Data Management. Archaeology has a somewhat dysfunctional relationship with digital data. It is great producer and consumer of the stuff but the methods that are used in these processes of creation and use tend to be so heterogeneous to verge on the level of chaos. Essentially, there are many archaeological projects and individual scholars out there operating within the digital domain but for the most part they are playing by their own rules. There are many historical reasons for this (perhaps the most pertinent being related to the old chestnut of whether archaeology is a science or an art) and the cumulative effect is of a field that is held back by its internal knowledge flow deficit.

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AS Micro

AS Micro was produced as part of the research that I conducted during my MPhil in Mesopotamian Archaeology degree that I did at the University of Cambridge during 2010-11. I chose to extend the line of questioning of the ArcSeer project by continuing to look at the subject of archaeological representation. For my dissertation I focussed specifically on stratigraphic methodology within archaeology.

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ArcSeer

I started the ArcSeer project in the autumn of 2009. This was the final year of my undergraduate degree at Trinity College Dublin and as such I was required to focus my attentions on a dissertation. I chose to write about the topic of representation in archaeology and while I began the work in the traditional manner by compiling and writing a review of existing and past practice in the field, I wanted to also move the discussion on to a consideration of how archaeological data and knowledge might be represented in new ways. I was particularly interested in how digital media and techniques might be used to represent the more subtle narratives that were being encouraged by the reflexive archaeologies espoused by Ian Hodder, Christopher Tilley, Michael Shanks and the others that had first reacted against the positivist dogma of the processualist archaeologies during the 1980s.

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